1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance Logo

1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance

Speakers

Available Speakers

Available Speakers

The 1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance is soliciting scientists, authors, photographers, engineers, historians, disaster preparedness specialists, and other experts willing to give talks, presentations, and demonstrations at various venues including schools, community centers, libraries, museums, and science centers as part of the activities commemorating the 1868 Earthquake.

This list of speakers and scheduled talks will be used to coordinate and publicize activities and events in 2008. We are especially interested in speakers who can address diverse audiences in communities that are often underrepresented for science, emergency preparedness, and history presentations.

David Bonowitz Structural Engineer, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute

Earthquake risk in Bay Area buildings (or subsets of buildings, such as housing, workplaces, etc.). What the building code says (and doesn't say) about earthquake safety. Public policy issues in earthquake preparedness and structural engineering.

Mr. Bonowitz will discuss public policy issues in earthquake preparedness and structural engineering. These can include an assessment of the hazards posed by various types of building construction found within the San Francisco Bay Area. He will also explain what earthquake building codes are designed to do (save lives) and what they are not designed to do (ensuring that buildings can be used) after earthquakes.

Biography

David Bonowitz is a Structural Engineer with twenty years of diverse earthquake engineering experience, including consulting to city, state, and federal agencies and research or practice in Guam, Japan, and Indonesia. His principal interest involves the incorporation of engineering standards into pre- and post-earthquake risk reduction policies. He has instructed engineers, architects, and insurance adjusters on how to perform post-earthquake inspections, and he did significant studies following the Loma Prieta, Guam, and Northridge earthquakes. From 2004 through 2007 he served as the first in-house Structural Engineer for California’s Judicial Branch.

Bonowitz chairs the Existing Buildings Committee of the National Council of Structural Engineers Associations, through which he develops and coordinates building code changes on behalf of the nationwide engineering community. He is past-chair of the SEAONC Existing Buildings and Seismology Committees.

Bonowitz was the 2004 recipient of SEAONC’s Edwin Zacher Award for Outstanding Service to the Structural Engineering Profession and the 2005 recipient of EERI Northern California’s Award for Innovation and Exemplary Practice in Earthquake Risk Reduction. In 2007 he was made a Fellow of the Structural Engineers Association of Northern California.

Bonowitz is a graduate of Princeton University and holds a Master’s Degree in Structural Engineering from U.C. Berkeley.

Expertise

Structural Engineering

Suggested Audience

General public, social organizations, professional organizations, policy makers

Suggested Venue

Standard Powerpoint projector presentation

Contact Info

dbonowitz@att.net, (415) 771-3227

David Schwartz Senior Earthquake Geologist, U.S. Geological Survey

David will describe the timing of prehistoric earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area for the past 2000 years, showing that at some times earthquakes appeared to occur closely together in time. David will discuss the chances for future earthquakes in the Bay Area during the next 30 years.

Biography

A leading earthquake geologist at the U. S. Geological Survey, Dr. David Schwartz is credited with having pushed forward the newly developing fields of earthquake geology and paleoseismology (the study of prehistorical seismic events). One of his major contributions is the characteristic earthquake recurrence model, which has become a cornerstone of many seismic hazard analyses.

David formerly headed the San Francisco Bay Area Earthquake Hazards Project and he co-chaired the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities that issued the 2003 Bay Area 30-year earthquake forecast. In addition, Dr. Schwarz served as the Regional Coordinator for the USGS Northern California Earthquake Hazard Program.

David has traveled extensively outside the U.S. looking at the ground cracking produced by large earthquakes around the world. He has described the Hayward Fault as a tectonic time bomb.

Expertise

The history of earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Suggested Audience

General public, social organizations, professional organizations, policy makers

Suggested Venue

Standard Powerpoint projector presentation

Contact Info

dschwartz@usgs.gov, 650-329-5651

Jack Boatwright Senior Seismologist, U.S. Geological Survey

mugshot of Jack Boatwright

Presentation on the damage caused by the 1868 Hayward earthquake and what damage we should expect from a repeat of that earthquake.

Jack developed maps showing the shaking intensity from the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and has recently completed a similar map for the 1868 Hayward earthquake. This work has taken him to the oldest sections of cemeteries around the Bay Area, in which he attempts to determine which percentage of the gravestones were broken by the 1868 and 1906 earthquakes. His results are equally spooky, and show that a repeat of either the 1906 or 1868 earthquake will produce strong shaking and damage throughout the Bay Area.

Biography

Jack Boatwright, a senior seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey, is currently serving as the Chief of Earthquake Effects Investigations in Northern California. Jack received his PhD in Seismology from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University and joined the USGS directly after.

Expertise

The effects of earthquakes and what shaking levels to expect from future earthquakes.

Suggested Audience

General public, professional organizations, policy makers

Suggested Venue

Standard Powerpoint projector presentation

Contact Info

boat@usgs.gov, 650-329-5609

Keith L. Knudsen Senior Engineering Geologist, California Geological Survey

mugshot of Keith L. Knudsen

Earthquakes, hazards, and public policy

Keith will describe how the various geologic materials found in the San Francisco Bay Area respond to earthquakes, why some fail and deform and others do not, and how recent laws protect us from these effects of earthquakes.

Biography

Keith L. Knudsen has been a Senior Engineering Geologist with the California Geological Survey for the past 8 years. He manages the Liquefaction Zoning Unit of the Seismic Hazards Zoning Program and also provides advisory services to local governments on the contents and use of seismic hazard zone maps.

Keith is a Quaternary geologist and geomorphologist who specializes in the assessment of earthquake hazards. Prior to coming to work for CGS, he was a consulting geologist for about 8 years, and prior to that, he taught high school physics for 5 years.

Keith speaks with many groups about earthquakes and related ground failures, as well as policies and laws designed to mitigate the effects of earthquakes. He lives in the East Bay.

Expertise

Earthquakes and related ground failures, as well as policies and laws designed to mitigate the effects of earthquakes

Suggested Audience

General public, school groups, social organizations, professional organizations, policy makers

Suggested Venue

Standard Powerpoint projector presentation

Contact Info

Keith L. Knudsen, 650-688-6367

Madelyn Mackie Program Manager, American Red Cross-Bay Area Chapter

mugshot of Madelyn Mackie

Prepare Bay Area!

Earthquakes. Pandemics. Tsunamis. Floods. Fires. Terrorist attacks. Residents of the great state of California are in the unfortunate position of having to worry about all of these potential disasters. Many choose to throw up their hands in early defeat, but there are other choices.

The goal of the American Red Cross Be Red Cross Ready program is to guide individuals through the process of getting ready for various types disasters, through three simple steps: MAKE A PLAN: Planning ahead is the first step to a calmer and more assured disaster response. Learn how to map an evacuation plan, when to replace disaster supplies and how to identify an appropriate out-of-area contact. GET A KIT: Learn which supplies to store for every member of your household, including any necessary items for infants, seniors and people with disabilities. Learn where to store your kit and when to refresh it. Discover tips on how to create the perfect kit for your family for as little as $1.00. BE INFORMED AND GET TRAINED: Find out what to do when disaster strikes. Learning basic preparedness and life-saving skills can give you the confidence and ability to help anyone in your family, community and at work in the event of an emergency.

Biography

Madelyn Mackie is the Program Manager for the American Red Cross Prepare Bay Area initiative. The mission of Prepare Bay Area is to empower residents in all six counties to take action to prepare for catastrophes such as earthquakes, fires, floods, pandemics, and terrorist attacks. Working with leading regional organizations and community leaders, the Red Cross and its partners will guide one million local residents in making an emergency plan, building a disaster kit and being informed about what to do and how to respond in the event of an emergency. Prior to joining the staff, Madelyn was a Red Cross Disaster Services Volunteer for Alameda County and responded to numerous fires, police actions and other disasters throughout the area.

Expertise

Emergency Preparedness/Earthquake Mitigation Basics

Suggested Audience

All Audiences

Suggested Venue

Any venue

Schedule

7 days a week, 8:00AM - 8:00PM

Contact Info

MackieMa@usa.redcross.org, (415)427-8153

Mary Lou Zoback Vice President, Earthquake Risk Applications, Risk Management Solutions

The 1906 Earthquake--lessons learned, lessons forgotten, and future directions

The 1906 magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the N. San Andreas Fault marked the birth of modern earthquake science. For the first time, the effects and impacts of a major seismic event were systematically investigated and documented including the entire 200-mile-long surface break. The full extent of the San Andreas fault throughout California was also mapped for the first time. Comprehensive study of 1906 shaking intensity showed the strongest shaking occurred in areas of "made land" (fill) and soft sediment, including China Basin and present day Marina district--two San Francisco neighborhoods heavily damaged again in 1989. Damage to structures showed destruction was closely related to building design and construction--a painful lesson oft repeated around the world. Interpretation of repeated surveying data and surface fault offsets led Henry Reid to propose the elastic rebound hypothesis--that earthquakes represent sudden release of elastic energy along a fault resulting from a cycle of slow strain accumulation produced by relative displacements of neighboring portions of the crust--this earthquake cycle is still accepted today with minor modifications, even though the basis for large-scale horizontal displacements wasn't established until the plate tectonic revolution five decades later.

We now know that a repeat of the 1906 earthquake is only one of a wide number of future major damaging earthquakes likely to impact the Bay Area. Although we can not predict earthquakes, we can predict their likely effects and the most hazardous regions. Looking to the future, a dense array of continuous GPS recorders in N. California, part of a new initiative by the National Science Foundation called EarthScope, can search for fault interactions and determine if an acceleration of strain rate precedes the next big earthquake, as it may have prior to 1906.

Biography

Dr. Mary Lou Zoback joined the U.S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park, California, in 1978 after receiving her Ph.D. in geophysics from Stanford University. From 1999-2002 she was Chief Scientist of the USGS Western Earthquake Hazards team. From 2002 to 2006 she served as the Regional Coordinator for the USGS Northern California Earthquake Hazard Program.

Dr. Zoback's primary research interest is the relationship between earthquakes and stress in the earth's crust. She has served on numerous national committees and panels on topics ranging from continental dynamics, storage of high-level radioactive waste, and science education. She is active in several professional societies and is past-President of the Geological Society of America and currently serves on the Council of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Zoback has received many awards, including the American Geophysical Union's Macelwane Award in 1987 for "significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability" and in 1995 was elected into the National Academy of Sciences. She was the chair of the Steering Committee for the "1906 Earthquake Centennial Alliance."

Expertise

Bay Area Earthquake Hazards, San Andreas fault, Hayward fault, 1906 earthquake, 1868 earthquake

Suggested Audience

General public, social organizations, professional organizations, business organizations, policy makers

Suggested Venue

Standard Powerpoint projector presentation

Contact Info

Marylou.zoback@rms.com, 510-505-3221

Richard Schwartz Historian, Author, Other

mugshot of Richard Schwartz

The East Bay experiences the 1868 Hayward Fault Earthquake

Richard has spoken on both the 1868 and 1906 Earthquakes scores of times and can customize the presentation to a specific audience or local focus. He has many fascinating first-hand accounts and rare images. He has researched the newspapers of the Bay Area and also provides what the people of the day thought of the aftermath, their own beliefs as to what caused earthquakes, and many other fascinating features of the eras.

Biography

Richard Schwartz grew up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1968 at Central High School he won varsity football's "Team Award" and was the undefeated Pennsylvania State Fencing Champion in 1969. Schwartz graduated from Temple University in 1973 with a bachelor's degree in English literature. For two years while at Temple he worked on a Pennsylvania Dutch farm eleven hours a day, three days a week. In 1976 Schwartz joined the U.S. Forest Service to fight fires in the Sierra. It was during this time that he came across an ancient sixty-five foot stone circle near Truckee. His curiosity about this configuration led to his first book, "The Circle of Stones," a nonfiction archeological mystery.

Schwartz has written articles for the Alameda County Historical Society, the Berkeley Historical Society, the Truckee Historical Society, and the Bay Area Rock Art Research Association on this and other Native American and American historical topics. He has given book readings for The Circle of Stones at bookstores and historical societies.

In 1982 Schwartz earned his General Building Contractors license from the State of California, where he is also certified to condemn and examine buildings for the State after an earthquake. He continues through the present to be active in the construction trades and has specialized in earthquake retrofitting and drainage work.

In 1996 Schwartz was at the Berkeley Historical Society when a stack of Berkeley newspapers circa 1900 was about to be discarded by the Society and he rescued the newspapers by taking them home. These rescued Berkeley Gazettes became the basis for the book "Berkeley 1900." Richard Schwartz put four years into the research, writing, and production of "Berkeley 1900" and published it himself. "Berkeley 1900" was on the East Bay Best Sellers List in the East Bay Express for ten months. The book was chosen by the San Francisco Chronicle as one of ten Holiday Gift Books in 2000.

Schwartz released "Earthquake Exodus, 1906" in November, 2005. It is the only book to focus on the refugees instead of the disaster. Mayor Tom Bates of Berkeley has already utilized the research in the book to comment in the San Francisco Chronicle on the response to Katrina. Schwartz presented a Certificate of Honor from San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom to the citizens of Berkeley for Berkelyeans' role in saving the lives of tens of thousands of refugees from the San Francisco 1906 Earthquake. The book was featured on many local TV and radio stations and even included international recognition in Europe.

In July of 2007, Schwartz released the book, "Eccentrics, Heroes, and Cutthroats of Old Berkeley" which documents the lives of seventeen men and women who were famous in their day (1850-1925), but have been all but forgotten in our modern world. It was these colorful pioneers that gave Berkeley its original character and their stories will be well utilized by our current citizens. The reviews and citizen feedback and appreciation of this latest work have been the most significant to date for Schwartz. He continues to give illustrated talks on history as well as continuing his career as a California building contractor.

Expertise

History, speaking

Suggested Audience

general public

Suggested Venue

any gathering from high school through adult.

Schedule

as available, see website and please call to check for availability even if date is not booked on website.

Contact Info

richard@richardschwartz.info, (510) 524-1683

Steve Tobriner Professor Emeritus of Architectural History, University of California, Berkeley

The 1868 earthquake and the birth of Earthquake-Resistant Architecture in San Francisco

Prof. Tobriner will explain how San Francisco architects, engineers, inventors and laymen tried to design and build seismically resistant structures after the earthquake of 1868. The earthquake was strongest of many than struck San Francisco in the 1860s, finally convincing both professionals and citizens that it was worth the effort to build seismically resistant structures. This little-known story is packed of intrigue and structural innovation, a fascinating episode in construction history, science, and social consciousness in San Francisco which lays to rest the myth that San Franciscans ignored and denied earthquake danger before and earthquake of 1906.

Biography

Prof. Tobriner recently retired from the Architecture Department at the University of California, Berkeley, where he taught architectural history for 35 years. He has written extensively on architecture and the history of reconstruction after earthquakes, and has investigated damage in earthquakes around the world with teams sponsored by the United Nations, the National Science Foundation, the Earthquake Engineering Research Center, and the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

Tobriner's book, Bracing for Disaster; Earthquake-resistant engineering and architecture in San Francisco 1838-1933 (Berkeley: Heyday Books and the Bancroft Library, 2006) is the first to trace the history of San Francisco in relation to the twin threats of earthquake and fire. The book presents the hitherto unknown history of efforts of many San Franciscans to
confront the danger of earthquakes long before the first mandatory state code in 1933.

Expertise

The history of Architecture and Cities with a specialty in earthquakes and earthquake-resistant construction worldwide. Prof. Tobriner is a fourth generation San Franciscan who has studied the city for most of his professional life.

Suggested Audience

General public, social organizations, professional organizations, architects, policy makers

Suggested Venue

Standard Powerpoint projector presentation

Contact Info

tobriner@berkeley.edu, 510-527-0966

Tom Brocher Senior Research Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey

mugshot of Tom Brocher

Biography

Tom Brocher, a senior seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey, is currently serving as the Coordinator for Earthquake Hazard Investigations
in Northern California.

After receiving degrees in Geology and Geophysics from the University of Michigan and Princeton University, he worked several years at the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. In his over 20-year career at the USGS, he has studied earthquake faults throughout the western United States and recently developed a new seismic hazard model for the Seattle fault zone.

His interest in the mitigation of seismic risk led to his participation in the multilingual translation of the popular earthquake preparedness pamphlet, Putting Down Roots in the San Francisco Bay Area. Tom was a Member of the Team which made computer animations of the ground shaking produced by the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes. Tom is the chair of the Steering Committee for the "1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance."

Suggested Audience

General public, school groups, social organizations, professional organizations, business organizations, policy makers

Suggested Venue

Standard Powerpoint projector presentation

Contact Info

brocher@usgs.gov, 650-329-4737